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Archive for the ‘ Migraine Headaches ’ Category

Migraine Headaches

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

For years, Susan had been living with incapacitating headaches that sometimes caused her to miss work or family events.  The headaches began in her late teens and have lasted until now, her mid-30’s.  Sometimes the headaches would start on a Monday and stretch all the way until Wednesday.  Quite frequently with these headaches Susan would experience nausea, as well as sensitivity to lights and sounds.  When these headaches came on, Susan would turn off all the lights, avoid people and hunker down.  What Susan did not realize is her headaches were in fact migraines!

Not everyone who lives with migraine headaches realize they are in fact getting a migraine.  3 million Americans are currently suffering with this condition.  Vision can become blurred, people can experience fatigue, stomach upset, and intense, throbbing pain.

Research is underway in New London testing an investigational medication for the prevention of migraine headaches. Dr. Laurence Radin, Dr. Edward McDermott, and Andrea Stewart APRN are members of a  Migraine Prevention Study  research team in New London. Individuals living with migraine headaches who may wish to learn more about this 9-month research study are welcome to call to speak with a member of the CCRstudies team at (860) 443-4567 or email marylou@ccrstudies.com.

 

Migraine Prevention Study

Monday, February 27th, 2017

The following article appeared in The Times “Health Wise” column, published by The Day newspaper.

You’re queasy. You have to turn off the lights, your head pain is so bad. It feels as if someone is hitting you in the face with a hammer. One side of your head is throbbing. What has brought on this angst? Tension? Stress? Chances are, if you are living with this type of pain, you are having a migraine headache. You head hurts so much, there seems to be no relief in sight.

A migraine is a type of headache which is intense and severe. In addition to head pain, additional migraine symptoms can include nausea, pain in the temples or pain behind one eye or your ear. People also report sensitivity to light, sounds and odors. Some migraines are more moderate, while others are more severe. It is not uncommon for individuals suffering with a migraine to have pain so intense it affects daily life. Vision can become blurred, and some people will see bright flashing lights, wavy lines or jagged lines, also known as an aura. Your migraine headache might also bring on stomach upset, fatigue and dizzy spells.

It has been reported that 3 million Americans currently suffer with migraine headaches. Migraines can begin as early as childhood, but may also manifest themselves in adolescence or in the young adult years.

According to the Mayo Clinic, there are four stages that a migraine progresses through including “prodrome, aura, headache and post-drome.” Not everyone experiences all of these stages.

The prodrome stage occurs in the days leading up to the migraine headache. The sufferer may experience a plethora of symptoms which could include mood changes, depression, neck stiffness, constipation, food cravings, increased urination, and increased thirst. During or before the onset of a migraine some individuals might experience an aura, but not all do. Once the migraine hits, it can last anywhere from a few hours to a few days without treatment. Just as each person is different, each migraine can be different.

After the migraine headache has dissipated, the “post-drome” stage takes place. Some individuals are left feeling utterly depleted after a migraine while others might experience the opposite symptoms, feeling significantly better than even before the migraine hit.

The causes of migraine headaches are not fully understood and new approaches are being tested to treat them before they strike. For some women, hormonal changes such as menopause or pregnancy can bring upon migraines. An imbalance in brain chemicals, goods, food additives, alcohol, sleep patterns, stress and a variety of physical and environmental factors may also contribute to what is a very unsettling syndrome for many.

Migraine headaches are painful, disruptive and for many, can be life limiting. As we move forward in regards to migraine research, ideally we can move forward with improved treatments.

In New London, research is underway to test a preventative treatment for migraine headaches. For individuals suffering 15 or more days of migraines each month, this investigational treatment is currently in the clinical trial phase. Those who are living with chronic migraines are welcome to contact the research site at (860)443-4567 to learn more about the study or visit www.CCRstudies.com to learn more about the clinical trial process.

 

 

 

Migraine Headache Research

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Research will be underway shortly in New London to test the safety and efficacy of a migraine prevention treatment.  Currently 3 million Americans report they suffer with migraine headaches. Migraine symptoms can range from moderate to severe and the headaches can start as early as childhood or young adulthood.

When someone is suffering from a migraine, they may experience nausea, blurred vision or auras, a sensitivity to lights, sounds, and odors, as well as a persistent throbbing pain behind the eyes or temples. A migraine can be “the mother of all headaches” in regards to the sometimes crippling pain.  This pain may be present on one of both sides of the head.  A migraine can last anywhere from 4 to 72 hours.  Researchers have taken a look at a variety of factors that might lead to a migraine including the chemical balance in the brain, hormonal fluctuations and reactions to food, environment and stress among other contributors.

Dr. Laurence Radin, New London neurologist, will serve as the Migraine Prevention study’s Primary Investigator. His team will consist of Andrea Stewart APRN and Jessie Hatfield LPN.  The study will be conducted at Coastal Connecticut Research in New London.  Those interested in learning more can call and speak to a member of the CCRstudies team at (860)443-4567 or email marylou@ccrstudies.com.