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Archive for the ‘ Urinary Incontinence ’ Category

Leak When You Laugh?

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017

Leak when you laugh?  Dribble when you dance?  Cross your legs tightly when you cough or sneeze for fear of pee coming out?

1 in 3 women live with stress urinary incontinence, the involuntary loss of urine.  Weakened pelvic muscles and a weakened sphincter due to childbirth can contribute to this, as well as multiple vaginal deliveries.  Not every woman keeps up with her kegels, and many of us aren’t too thrilled with the idea of kegel balls. Women are more likely than men to live with uncontrolled urine leaks.

What’s a woman to do?  Research is underway in New London for stress urinary incontinence (urine leaks.)  Those interested in learning more are welcome to call (860) 443-4567.  The CCRstudies team is part of a nationwide effort testing an investigational medication for the treatment of involuntary urine leaks.

Overactive Bladder

Monday, December 19th, 2016

Susan, 67,  had lived with frequent urination for the past several years.  Rushing to the bathroom, being unable to sit through a movie, always making a trip to the restroom before ordering at a restaurant and returning to the restroom prior to dessert were par for the course for Susan.  A few times a week, Susan barely made it to the bathroom since she felt such a sudden urge to urinate.  She wore pads daily, an expense she did not like incurring but felt was necessary for those times she didn’t quite make it to the toilet and leaked.

Susan was unaware she was living with a real medication condition known as Overactive Bladder or OAB.  With a normal bladder, you control when you go to the bathroom.  With Overactive Bladder, you are controlled by the frequent and sudden urges to urinate.

In addition to not knowing she was living with Overactive Bladder (OAB), Susan was also unaware there were medications on the market to help control the symptoms of this condition.  She heard about a research study seeking women living with Overactive Bladder and it finally occurred to her this is something she might be living with.

Unfortunately, quite a few women living with OAB might dismiss their symptoms.  Some women may attribute their lack of bladder control to aging, childbirth or weakened muscles.  Some might think these symptoms are normal, or there is nothing they can do about it.

Investigational medications and FDA-approved medications continue to be tested in the clinical trial process to evaluate their safety and efficacy.  Clinical research is underway in New London on a FDA-approved medication.  Women who are 65 and older who visit the bathroom more than 8 times per day might be interested in learning more.  Robert M. Spitz, MD is the study doctor.  Call (860)443-4567 or email marylou@ccrstudies.com to learn more.

Overactive Bladder Research Study

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

Overactive Bladder (OAB) is a condition experienced by 200 million people throughout the world. People living with OAB often experience a sudden and urgent need to use the bathroom, waking up to go to the bathroom more than once per night, incontinence, and frequent trips to the bathroom.  What causes OAB is not fully understood, but it is believed the bladder muscle becomes overactive and contracts when you don’t want it to.

Treatments for OAB are available, but different age groups respond in different ways to medication.  CCRstudies is currently conducting a clinical research trial for women 65 and older who are living with OAB.  The study medication being evaluated is FDA-approved.  There is no cost to participate in the clinical research study, and no cost for the study medication.  There are 7 office visits over the course 20 weeks.  Reimbursement of up to $525 is available to the study patient for time and travel.  Dr. Robert Spitz is the study doctor, and all visits will take place in New London at 342 Montauk Avenue.

If you are a woman over 65 who is living with Overactive Bladder, you are welcome to contact a member of the CCRstudies team to learn more about this clinical research trial. Call (860)443-4567, or email marylou@ccrstudies.com.