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Archive for the ‘ Clinical Research in New London CT ’ Category

2021- Looking Ahead

Monday, December 21st, 2020

2021 – the promise of a new year!  2020 was a year like no other.  Some people cannot wait to say goodbye to the year in which our global community dealt with the impact of Covid-19.  Many lives were lost, our way of life changed drastically, and turmoil abounded.  Some found opportunities to grow and thrive. Others faced daily challenges.  So many are breathing a collective sigh of relief as we look ahead to some global healing as the vaccination process begins.

Here at Coastal Connecticut Research we are looking ahead to 2021 and excited to roll out some new studies and will continue enrolling for some studies which we began recruiting for prior to the pandemic.  Our early  2021 studies include clinical research trials evaluating study products for birth control, migraine headaches, memory loss and Parkinson’s disease, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and more to be listed.  As always, our research volunteers play a key role in the success of these research studies.

We’re looking forward to keep you posted on all that is happening here in the coming year!  Call (860)443-4567 to learn more, e-mail marylou@ccrstudies.com or sign up here on our website.

Birth Control Research

Thursday, July 9th, 2020

A recent decision by the United States Supreme Court is expected to make obtaining access to affordable birth control by prescription considerably more difficult for some women whose employers do not wish to cover those services.  Under the Affordable Care Act, women were supposed to be granted access to no cost contraception.  Unfortunately, many women who wish to engage in responsible family planning are not always able to afford a monthly prescription to a birth control pill or other contraceptive product.

Clinical research is underway in New London evaluating an investigational, oral birth control product.  Not everyone is aware there is no cost to participate in a clinical research trial and no cost for the study product.  All labs, exams and testing are available at no cost.  Women will also receive the birth control study product for one year at no cost.  Reimbursement may also be available for time and travel.

Some choose to participate in research because they like the feeling of helping others.  Some choose to participate in research because their health care options are limited, they are uninsured or under-insured, and they appreciate the no-cost study related healthcare.  Decisions to participate in research are personal, but the impact of volunteering creates a ripple effect in regards to helping to advance medicine.

If you wish to learn more about clinical healthcare research studies in New London, call to speak to a member of the CCRstudies team at (860)443-4567. You can also email marylou@ccrstudies.com or text the keyword CCR to 74121.

Keeping Our Patients Safe and Healthy

Thursday, May 7th, 2020

Thank you for your continued participation in research during these unprecedented times.

In order to continue to operate safely, we request you inform our site if you have been in contact recently with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. This could be a family member you live with, a colleague at work, or someone you may care for.

As you are aware our site has a variety of measures and protocols in place in order to comply with social distancing initiatives and to keep our patients and staff safe and healthy.

We appreciate your support in this endeavor and thank you for being a dedicated research volunteer.

You are welcome to call us at (860)443-4567.

Thank you again for your cooperation and participation.

Dr. Robert M. Spitz

Medical Director

Coastal Connecticut Research

 

How Are You Doing?

Tuesday, April 7th, 2020

How are you doing?  We sincerely hope you and your loved ones are in good health.  A few months ago who knew the term “social distancing” would become such a part of our everyday lives?  We appreciate all of our study volunteers who have continued to participate in research (with the proper safety measure and protocols in place.)  We also are proud to work in the important field of research. Many Americans who were once unfamiliar with the term “clinical trial” are beginning to hear more about how important it is to find new ways of treating disease, illness and chronic conditions.

While life as we once knew it may be temporarily on hold, there are many things you can do to continue to enjoy your quality of life.  Journal.  Keep a gratitude list. Go out for a walk each day (keeping proper social distance of course!)  Gaze up at a clear blue sky. Play with your dog.  Hug your kids.  Place a zoom call with some old friends.  Play scrabble.  Sit down for a meal with your family.  Smile. Breathe deeply.  Meditate. You get the picture.

We are still screening patients for our hot flash study and are pre-screening patients over the telephone for studies including migraines and work productivity, Parkinson’s disease, birth control and Alzheimer’s disease.  If you wish to learn more, contact us, we’re here – (860)443-4567.

Stay well!

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2019

 

The SKYLIGHT clinical study is seeking eligible candidates for a non-hormonal, investigational drug for hot flashes.

Hot flash clinical study

Call (860)443-4567

Study Gynecologist: Dr. Robert M. Spitz

Sign up online
www.CCRstudies.com

Coastal Connecticut Research

 

Click below to hear more:

 

Autumn!

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018

Autumn is upon us!  The hectic pace of summer has been replaced by the relaxed pace of autumn.  October is typically a lovely month here in Southeastern Connecticut with the opportunity to still enjoy all our lovely coast has to offer!

At Coastal Connecticut research, this autumn has us focusing on clinical research studies evaluating study products for MS walking impairment, Alzheimer’s agitation and Overactive Bladder.  Information on upcoming studies will be shared as we prepare for enrollment.  Those interested in learning more are always encouraged to contact our site and speak to a member of the CCRstudies team at (860) 443-4567.

Here’s What Volunteers Are Saying…

Tuesday, January 9th, 2018

We are very grateful for all of our research volunteers.  At the conclusion of each study, we ask our volunteers to take the time to fill out a survey and let us know how we’re doing.  We pride ourselves on treating our patients with the highest level of professionalism and respect, all while providing quality study-related health care.

Recently M. of Norwich noted the study she participated in was to her body what “love is to the soul.”  (Wow…her words!)  S. of Mystic described our site as “friendly and comfortable.”  She continued, “I”ll do it again.” D. of North Stonington noted, “It was fascinating to me. I learned a lot.”

Our volunteers are at the heart of what we do.  Thank you to all those who participate in clinical trials at Coastal Connecticut Research. We are most grateful for your time and for your valued feedback!

If you curious about research, or have participated in a trial and want to share your experiences, contact us at (860) 443-4567. You can also email marylou@ccrstudies.com.

Leak When You Laugh?

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017

Leak when you laugh?  Dribble when you dance?  Cross your legs tightly when you cough or sneeze for fear of pee coming out?

1 in 3 women live with stress urinary incontinence, the involuntary loss of urine.  Weakened pelvic muscles and a weakened sphincter due to childbirth can contribute to this, as well as multiple vaginal deliveries.  Not every woman keeps up with her kegels, and many of us aren’t too thrilled with the idea of kegel balls. Women are more likely than men to live with uncontrolled urine leaks.

What’s a woman to do?  Research is underway in New London for stress urinary incontinence (urine leaks.)  Those interested in learning more are welcome to call (860) 443-4567.  The CCRstudies team is part of a nationwide effort testing an investigational medication for the treatment of involuntary urine leaks.

Understanding Alzheimer’s Research

Monday, May 8th, 2017

Recently, we had the pleasure of attending the first annual Senior Strong Summit in Mystic, Connecticut. The program focused on topics ranging from estate planning to Alzheimer’s disease care giving and research.  The event was organized by the Mystic Geriatrics Institute, an newly formed non-profit with a focus on the changing face of elder care and empowering seniors.

We feel it’s important to participate in such events to educate the public on the important role research plays in the future treatment of disease.  Ideally those who conduct research throughout the world can someday find a cure for this global epidemic of the aging population which currently affects 5 million Americans.  What we shared with those in attendance is the current research at our site takes different approaches to Alzheimer’s.  Some of studies testing investigational medications focus on improving Alzheimer’s symptoms, with a future goal of better treating the disease.   We have tested investigational medications designed to target memory, thinking, reasoning and cognition. We are also in the process of testing an investigational medication for those living with mild dementia designed to promote better sleep.  Observational studies, those studies that do not test a medication, have looked at ways to diagnose Alzheimer’s earlier and more accurately. Some observational studies focus on biomarkers such as blood,  brain wave patterns and Amyloid proteins on the brain.  Just as each and every person is different, each and every research study we conduct is different. Our studies are conducted with highest ethical standards.

As noted to those who attended the Senior Strong Summit, clinical research follows a protocol which is black and white, but Alzheimer’s disease has many shades of gray and creates some complex issues for the person suffering from the disease and those caring for the person living with the disease.   Those who consent to clinical research are participating as volunteers, and their participation can someday help others living with the same condition.

Call us at (860) 443-4567 if you would like to learn more about research or wish for us to participate in your next event.

 

Technology and the Brain

Wednesday, April 12th, 2017

We in the 21st century are living in an advanced age.  At the click of our fingers, we have access to a plethora of information thanks to the world wide web.  Virtually everyone carries a smartphone, a revolution in technology.  So much for looking things up in our “Funk and Wagnalls” encyclopedia!

The advent of technology has also had an impact on modern medicine and research.  Technology that provides “a window on the brain”* has become a part of the clinical trial process for Alzheimer’s research.

To better treat Alzheimer’s, we need to better understand the disease.  Research which looks at markers for having dementia – brain wave patterns, blood, thinking, reasoning, and remembering, can help better diagnose and ultimately monitor Alzheimer’s  in the future.  MRI’s, CT scans and PET scans are also utilized.

A research registry is currently enrolling eligible volunteers ages 50 and above who have cognitive impairment of suspected Alzheimer’s disease.  The research opportunity provides a no cost PET scan (positron emmission tomography),  This “picture of the brain” will help to identify the amyloid plaque (a buildup of sticky protein) in the brain.  These proteins are one of the hallmarks of memory disease.

Those who are interested in learning more about research opportunities for individuals with memory loss are welcome to contact Coastal Connecticut Research at (860) 443-4567.  The memory loss research team includes local neurologist Dr. Laurence Radin, Andrea Stewart APRN, Diane Palmer RN, Jeannine Elliott RN and Jessie Hatfield LPN.

 

 

 

 

 

*The Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives