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Archive for the ‘ Dr. Radin ’ Category

OCD – Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Thursday, November 19th, 2020

Out of control thoughts, images, and obsessive behaviors and the inability to control these thoughts, images and behaviors. This is a simple explanation of an extremely complicated mental illness – Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, also known as OCD.  This goes far beyond someone’s idea of obsessive cleaning or obsessive handwashing. There are considerable layers to this condition and it can manifest itself in a variety of ways.

Coastal Connecticut Research will be conducting a clinical research trial evaluating a study product for individuals living with OCD.  This condition can affect people of all ages and from all walks of life.   Further details on the trial will be made available as the enrollment period nears.  Those who may wish to learn more about research in this area are welcome to call and speak to a member of the CCRstudies team at (860)443-4567 or email marylou@ccrstudies.com.

Alzheimer’s Research Announced in New London

Thursday, October 8th, 2020

New LUCIDITY clinical study to investigate potential treatment for people with Alzheimer’s disease

New London, October 2020- Coastal Connecticut Research has announced the start of patient recruitment for the LUCIDITY study (NCT03446001), a new clinical research study to evaluate an investigational drug in people who are experiencing memory loss, or have been diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI or MCI-AD), Probable/Early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or Mild-Moderate AD.

Dr. Laurence Radin will be serving as Principal Investigator of the study. He has served as the study doctor on over 10 clinical research trials for Alzheimer’s disease at Coastal Connecticut Research supported by a team of sub-investigators.

Although it is often accepted that some degree of forgetfulness is a natural part of the aging process, more severe memory loss – especially that which impacts daily life – could be an early sign of AD. Up to one third of people with MCI will go on to develop dementia,1 which affects around 50 million people worldwide.2

Currently, a limited number of approved treatments help with the symptoms of AD, but do not stop the disease from progressing.3 There are many factors and underlying challenges that contribute to the difficulty of developing new treatment options.3 However, rapid advances in our understanding of the underlying causes and risk factors associated with AD have led to new therapeutic targets and approaches.

Recent evidence suggests that Tau tangles are a potential driver in the progressive dementia that characterizes AD .4,5 Tau is a protein that forms part of a brain cell’s structure called a ‘microtubule.’ The microtubule helps transport nutrients within the brain cell and stabilizes the axons (a portion of a nerve cell) that connect one brain cell to another. In people with AD, Tau proteins do not function properly and form tangles inside the brain cells. This leads to a breakdown in the brain cell’s ability to communicate with other brain cells, which causes the symptoms of AD.6

Following nearly 30 years of research, researchers believe that a second-generation Tau aggregation inhibitor (TAI) could reduce the build-up of Tau tangles, and in doing so, could help slow disease progression and enhance quality of life for people with AD. Previous Phase 3 clinical trials (NCT01689233 and NCT01689246) support the possibility that this investigational treatment could be effective as a monotherapy, at a dose as low as 4 mg twice daily.7,8

Principal Investigator Dr. Laurence Radin said: “It is crucial we continue to research new targets and treatment options for Alzheimer’s disease. We are pleased to support the roll-out of the LUCIDITY study in Southeastern Connecticut, of which the results have the potential to provide renewed hope for the many people affected by this devastating disease.”

The LUCIDITY study, sponsored by TauRx Therapeutics Ltd. (“TauRx”), will evaluate the effects of this treatment in slowing or delaying memory loss in people who are not receiving other approved treatments for AD (cholinesterase inhibitors and/or memantine). Approximately 450 people in more than 100 study centers across North America and Europe are expected to take part in this study. The results of the study will help determine whether the investigational drug should progress to the final stages of clinical development.

Professor Claude Wischik, Executive Chairman and Co-Founder of TauRx, comments: “With no current cure and an aging population, Alzheimer’s disease is a pressing societal concern and there is an urgent need for new solutions. Our drug, an oral second-generation TAI, has already demonstrated encouraging signals in terms of efficacy and safety in previous trials, to the extent that it warrants further investigation. It’s our aim to find innovative and lasting solutions for patients living with Alzheimer’s disease, and we believe that Tau aggregation inhibition could be part of that solution.”

To learn more about the LUCIDITY study and to find out if you are eligible to participate, visit the trial website: LUCIDITYtrial.com or call Coastal Connecticut Research at (860)443-4567.  Information is also available at ccrstudies.com.

About Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurologic disease of the brain that causes damage to neurons – the specialized cells of the nervous system that enable the flow of information, thoughts and memories in the brain. When Alzheimer’s damages neurons it leads to loss of memory and reasoning, which can affect a person’s ability to interact socially or function at work. No treatment yet exists to halt the progression of Alzheimer’s-related dementia, delay its onset, or prevent it from occurring. Currently available drugs only treat the symptoms temporarily.

Tau aggregation inhibitors

TauRx’s Tau aggregation inhibitors (TAIs) have arisen from nearly 30 years of research, preclinical and clinical investigations. TAIs work by undoing the Tau tangles that cause dementia, thereby potentially slowing and even arresting memory loss. The first-generation TAI, rember® was a patented, highly-purified version of methylthioninium chloride (methylene blue), a compound previously used to treat a variety of conditions.

About the LUCIDITY Study

LUCIDITY is a two-phase outpatient study with Phase 1 being a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-arm, 52-week safety and efficacy study and Phase 2 being an open-label, delayed start study, of an investigational drug in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI or MCI-AD), or Probable/Early or Mild-Moderate Alzheimer’s disease. The primary objective of the LUCIDITY study is to demonstrate that the investigational treatment, given as a monotherapy at doses of 8 mg/day and 16mg/day, is effective compared to placebo in delaying the pathological and clinical progression of the disease. This will be measured using standard clinical cognitive and functional assessments; the study is expected to last up to 120 weeks for individual participants. LUCIDITY is now recruiting in sites across the United States, Canada, UK, France, Belgium, Italy, Spain and Poland. For further information, please visit: www.LUCIDITYtrial.com.

About Site

Coastal Connecticut Research in New London has partnered with community volunteers for over 20 years in conducting healthcare clinical research.  The site was founded by Dr. Robert M. Spitz who also serves as Medical Director.  In their two-decade history, 20 medications evaluated by community volunteers have gained FDA approval.

References

  1. Mavrodaris A, et al. Prevalences of dementia and cognitive impairment among older people in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review. Bull World Health Organ 2013, 91:773–783.
  2. World Health Organization. 2016 Dementia Fact Sheet. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs362/en/ Accessed February 2019.
  3. Alzheimer’s Association. 2018 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures. Available at: https://alz.org/media/HomeOffice/Facts%20and%20Figures/facts-and-figures.pdf Accessed February 2019.
  4. Simić G, et al. Tau protein hyperphosphorylation and aggregation in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies, and possible neuroprotective strategies. Biomolecules 2016, 6(1):6.
  5. Iqbal K, et al. Tau pathology in Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies. Biochim Biophys 2005, 1739(2-3):198–210.
  6. National Institute of Ageing. 2008 Alzheimer’s disease: Unravelling the mystery. Available at: https://adrccares.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/alzheimers_disease_unraveling_the_mystery_0.pdf Accessed February 2019.
  7. Gauthier S, et al. Efficacy and safety of tau-aggregation inhibitor therapy in patients with mild or moderate Alzheimer’s disease: a randomised, controlled, double-blind, parallel-arm, phase 3 trial. The Lancet 2016, 388:2873-84.
  8. Wilcock GK, et al. Potential of Low Dose Leuco-Methylthioninium Bis (Hydromethanesulphonate) (LMTM) Monotherapy for Treatment of Mild Alzheimer’s Disease: Cohort Analysis as Modified Primary Outcome in a Phase III Clinical Trial. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease 2017, 61:435-457.

Media contacts:

MaryLou Gannotti

Email: marylou@ccrstudies.com

Call: (860)437-7092

Visit online: www.CCRstudies.com

LUCIDITY study website: LUCIDITYtrial.com

TauRx website: http://www.taurx.com

 

Alzheimer’s Agitation

Monday, January 22nd, 2018

Are you a stressed out caregiver? Has mom or dad become too much to handle?  Are you a spouse living with someone diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and every day is a struggle?

Agitation in Alzheimer’s disease can be unpredictable and frustrating. Symptoms can include cursing or verbal combativeness, shouting, hitting or kicking, pushing or grabbing, pacing and aimless wandering, general restlessness and more. Does this sound like your loved one?

Neurologist Dr. Laurence Radin and the CCRstudies team  are conducting the TRIAD Research Study.  Individuals with agitation due to Alzheimer’s disease along with their caregivers may be eligible to participate.  The study is evaluating and investigational medication that may help with the symptoms of Alzheimer’s agitation.  Agitation can be defined as the presence of one of more of these behavoirs:  excessive motor activity, verbal aggression, or physical aggression.

Males and females 50 to 90 years of age who have a diagnosis of probable Alzheimer’s disease may be eligible to participate.  The study has approximately 8 clinic visits over the course of 16 weeks. Reimbursement is available for time and travel.

If you know someone living at home, in an assisted living facility or in a nursing home who is living with Alzheimer’s agitation and you would like to learn more about the TRIAD Research Study, call (860) 443-4567 or email marylou@ccrstudies.com.

November is Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017

 

CCRstudies is a member of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America.

November is national Alzheimer’s Awareness Month.

Here at Coastal Connecticut Research, we’ve been heavily involved in the fight against Alzheimer’s.  We have conducted a variety of Alzheimer’s clinical research studies with primary investigator Dr. Laurence Radin, who specializes in neurology.  We have also provided community members with no cost memory screenings

as a public service through the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America’s early detection program.  To date, over 100 no cost screenings have been offered to the public through our Mobile Memory Clinics.

Over 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, a progressive, degenerative condition.  Research will continue to help discover and  develop improved treatments for individuals living with memory loss.

If you or someone you know is living with memory loss, has a family history of memory loss, or would like to learn more about research involving memory loss, call to speak to a member of the CCRstudies team at (860) 443-4567 or email marylou@ccrstudies.com. 

 

Migraine Headaches

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

For years, Susan had been living with incapacitating headaches that sometimes caused her to miss work or family events.  The headaches began in her late teens and have lasted until now, her mid-30’s.  Sometimes the headaches would start on a Monday and stretch all the way until Wednesday.  Quite frequently with these headaches Susan would experience nausea, as well as sensitivity to lights and sounds.  When these headaches came on, Susan would turn off all the lights, avoid people and hunker down.  What Susan did not realize is her headaches were in fact migraines!

Not everyone who lives with migraine headaches realize they are in fact getting a migraine.  3 million Americans are currently suffering with this condition.  Vision can become blurred, people can experience fatigue, stomach upset, and intense, throbbing pain.

Research is underway in New London testing an investigational medication for the prevention of migraine headaches. Dr. Laurence Radin, Dr. Edward McDermott, and Andrea Stewart APRN are members of a  Migraine Prevention Study  research team in New London. Individuals living with migraine headaches who may wish to learn more about this 9-month research study are welcome to call to speak with a member of the CCRstudies team at (860) 443-4567 or email marylou@ccrstudies.com.

 

Migraine Headache Research

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Research will be underway shortly in New London to test the safety and efficacy of a migraine prevention treatment.  Currently 3 million Americans report they suffer with migraine headaches. Migraine symptoms can range from moderate to severe and the headaches can start as early as childhood or young adulthood.

When someone is suffering from a migraine, they may experience nausea, blurred vision or auras, a sensitivity to lights, sounds, and odors, as well as a persistent throbbing pain behind the eyes or temples. A migraine can be “the mother of all headaches” in regards to the sometimes crippling pain.  This pain may be present on one of both sides of the head.  A migraine can last anywhere from 4 to 72 hours.  Researchers have taken a look at a variety of factors that might lead to a migraine including the chemical balance in the brain, hormonal fluctuations and reactions to food, environment and stress among other contributors.

Dr. Laurence Radin, New London neurologist, will serve as the Migraine Prevention study’s Primary Investigator. His team will consist of Andrea Stewart APRN and Jessie Hatfield LPN.  The study will be conducted at Coastal Connecticut Research in New London.  Those interested in learning more can call and speak to a member of the CCRstudies team at (860)443-4567 or email marylou@ccrstudies.com.

Observational Alzheimer’s Study

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

Volunteers are needed for an exploratory, observational clinical study for memory loss in New London.  The study is looking to see if having markers for dementia, such as brain wave patterns, blood, and cognition will help diagnose and monitor Alzheimer’s Disease more easily and earlier in the future.  Coastal Connecticut Research is seeking individuals in the early stages of memory loss to participate in this clinical research trial.

If you or someone you know living with dementia is under the age of 90, you may be eligible to participate in this clinical research study.  Neurologist Dr. Laurence Radin is the study doctor.  The study team is comprised of highly trained nurses and Qualified Dementia Care Specialists.

Study tests are non-invasive.  All study-related labs, exams and testing are provided at no cost.  No insurance is required. Reimbursement is available for time and travel.  If you have questions or interest in this study, contact a member of the CCRstudies team at (860)443-4567 or email marylou@ccrstudies.com.

Observational Alzheimer’s Study

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016
Alzheimer’s patients and healthy volunteers are needed to participate in an exploratory, observational clinical study being conducted in New London at Coastal Connecticut Research. New London County Neurologist Dr. Laurence Radin is the study doctor. The intent of the study is to help diagnose and monitor Alzheimer’s Disease more easily and earlier in the fut
Those who may be eligible to participate in the study are living with mild to moderate memory loss and under the age of 90.
There are 2 study visits over the course of 1 year.  No study drug is involved. The Alzheimer’s patient can continue with his or her usual medication and diet as normal.
There is no cost to participate in this clinical research study, no insurance is needed, and reimbursement is available to the study patient for time and travel. Study tests are non-invasive and are provided at no cost.  Study procedures, including an MRI (if needed) and a EEG are performed at no cost.
If you are interested in participating as an Alzheimer’s patient or as a healthy volunteer, please contact a member of the CCRstudies team today at (860)443-4567 or email marylou@ccrstudies.com. Referrals are also welcome.
Coastal Connecticut Research is a member of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America.Flyer with CCR contact information US Spelling

Alzheimer’s Study

Wednesday, November 25th, 2015

STARBEAM STUDY Postcard CCR

Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease of the brain. Brian cells die over a period of several years, and symptoms progress from mild to severe.  Alzheimer’s is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S., and affects over 5 million Americans.

It has been over a decade since the FDA has approved any new medications for the treatment of Alzheimer’s.  Clinical research is currently underway in New London at CCRstudies, testing an investigational add-on medication. The team of investigators includes Laurence Radin, MD, Edward McDermott, Jr., MD, and Andrea Stewart, APRN.   This medication is taken in conjunction with the study patients current dosage of Aricept (Donepezil.)  The investigational medication is designed to improve thinking, memory, reasoning and cognition.  It is the Phase 3 of the clinical trial process.

Those interested in learning more about the Alzheimer’s study underway in New London can contact a member of the CCRstudies team at (860)443-4567, or click on this link for further details  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1LgVnQ3pqU.

In addition to the study patient, caregivers play an important role in this trial.  There is no cost to participate and compensation is available for time and travel to the study patient and caregiver.

Alzheimer’s Awareness

Friday, October 30th, 2015
CCRstudies is a member of the Alzheimer's Foundation of America.

CCRstudies is a member of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America.

November is National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month. Volunteers are needed for an Alzheimer’s study being conducted in New London by Dr. Laurence Radin, Dr. Edward McDermott, and Andrea Stewart, APRN.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia in adults 65 and over.  Dementia is a general term which describes a group of symptoms related to the loss of a variety of intellectual functions.  This can include loss in memory, judgment, language and complex motor skills which may interfere with daily living.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America notes that “Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging: however, age is the greatest known risk factor.  Other factors are genetic makeup and chronic untreated health problems such as high blood pressure.”

There is no cure currently available for Alzheimer’s disease, but there are FDA-approved medications available that can help to slow the progression of disease symptoms.

Research is currently underway in New London testing an investigational add-on medication for the treatment of Alzheimer’s. Volunteers with mild to moderate memory loss currently taking Aricept are needed as potential study volunteers. There has been no new medication introduced for the treatment of Alzheimer’s in over a decade.  If you or someone you know, ages 50 or above, is living with mild to moderate memory loss, you may qualify for this research study.  Call a member of the CCRstudies Team at 860-443-4567 today to learn more about how you can be involved in research.  Study participants and caregivers are eligible to receive compensation for their time and travel in addition to no cost study-related care.